An administrative manager, also known as an administrative services manager or business office manager, oversees an organization’s administrative operations. Depending on the size of the employer, an administrative manager may be the sole person providing administrative support, or he or she may supervise the company’s receptionists, administrative assistants and other office personnel.

Job Outlook for Administrative Managers

According to the U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), employment of administrative managers is expected to increase by 8% between 2014 and 2024, about the same as the average job growth rate for all occupations nationwide.

The administrative manager position can be found across numerous industries. Candidates with leadership and team-building skills, solid communications capabilities and an updated knowledge of technology may have stronger job prospects.

Job Duties for Administrative Managers

Administrative managers may have responsibility for the office budget, as well as the maintenance schedules for supplies, equipment and technological systems. Additionally, these professionals may manage the schedules of the company’s top executives.

Administrative managers are often the first point of contact for general business questions. Depending on the size and nature of the company, they may handle human resources duties such as employee orientation, contracts and payroll issues.

Because their daily duties can be varied and unpredictable, administrative managers should be able to manage different personalities and handle shifting priorities while maintaining a calm, professional demeanor. Administrative managers also need to be highly organized multi-taskers who are comfortable managing others, providing feedback, motivating the administrative support team and resolving office conflicts.

Administrative Manager Salary Potential

The Bureau of Labor Statistics reports that the average annual salary of administrative services managers nationwide was $86,110 as of May 2015. The top 10% of earners had yearly salaries of more than $153,000. Average salaries for these professionals were higher in industries such as financial investment, petroleum products manufacturing, and securities and commodities, the BLS notes.

Regional market conditions are a factor in determining salary potential, as are a candidate’s educational qualifications and employment history.

Education and Training

Employers may require administrative managers to have an undergraduate degree, and a potential first step for individuals seeking to establish a career path in this field can be to enroll in an associate’s in business administration program.

A business administration degree program should prepare students to:

  • Communicate effectively in the business environment
  • Integrate skills from a number of disciplines, including accounting, economics, law and management
  • Utilize computer applications
  • Exercise critical-thinking methods to identify and solve problems

Is an Administrative Manager Career Right for You?

Administrative management requires professionals with financial, organizational and interpersonal skills. If you enjoy juggling multiple projects every day, managing people and being in charge of an office, then a career as an administrative manager may be an excellent option.

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