Promotions managers collaborate with art directors, sales agents and financial staff members to plan programs that generate interest in a company’s product or service. A majority of these marketing professionals work for advertising agencies that create ad campaigns for clients, media companies that sell ad space or time, and in businesses that place heavy focus on advertising.

Promotions managers typically work with art directors, sales agents, financial staff members and other marketing professionals.

Job Outlook

The U.S. Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS) anticipates a 13% job growth for promotions managers between 2010 and 2020, which is about the average growth rate for all occupations. These professionals will continue to be essential to businesses as they seek to maintain and expand market share, especially when introducing new products to the marketplace. Strong competition is expected, especially among promotions managers who are proficient using digital tools.

While newspaper companies, one of the industries hiring the most promotions managers, are expected to decline by 22% over the next 5 years, job growth is expected to pick up in other areas, such as digital and Internet advertising.

Job Duties

The primary goal of a promotions manager is to direct programs that combine advertising with promotional content in order to motivate buyers to make purchases. These programs typically include newspaper inserts, direct mail, in-store displays, Internet advertisements, product endorsements or special events. Promotions may also include discounts, gifts, samples, coupons, rebates and contests to further motivate consumers to purchase.

Promotions managers typically work with department staff to discuss contracts, advertising media outlets and products. This involves gathering and organizing information for ad campaigns and choosing the best media outlets, such as radio, print, television, online or billboards. Once the media is planned, managers negotiate advertising contracts.

After contracts are determined, managers must examine the artistic plans for the ad. This may require them to conduct market research to assess which creative will be best received by consumers. Promotions managers also develop pricing strategies in alignment with a firm’s goals and meet with clients to offer marketing advice. In addition, they manage the hiring of promotions staff and oversee their daily work.

Salary Potential

Promotions managers typically work full time and earn a median salary of $83,890, according to the BLS. This indicates that half of workers in the occupation earned more than $83,890 and half earned less. According to 2010 BLS data, the lowest 10% made less than $41,480 while the highest 10% earned over $166,400.

Education and Training Requirements

Most promotions manager positions require at least a bachelor’s degree, preferably in advertising or journalism. Job seekers should take relevant classes in marketing, consumer behavior, sales, communication methods and technology, market research or photography. Those with work experience in advertising, marketing, promotions, or sales are preferred.

Promotions managers are usually creative and possess analytical, decision-making, interpersonal and management skills.

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