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What Can You Do with a Bachelor’s Degree in Human Resources Management?

The COVID-19 pandemic had a significant impact on the role of human resources (HR) in organizations. HR professionals had to quickly adapt to new challenges such as remote work, health and safety concerns, and changing employee needs. As a result, the role of HR has become more strategic, focusing on employee engagement and support, and managing risk.  

Earning an undergraduate degree in a Society for Human Resource Management (SHRM) accredited program means the curriculum has been reviewed and validated, narrowing the gap between what is taught in colleges and the skills HR practitioners are currently seeking in the field.  

The following roles typically only require a bachelor’s degree in HR or a related field: human resources specialist, training and development manager and diversity and inclusion manager.   

Human Resources Specialist 

The job of a human resources specialist is to ensure that HR processes run smoothly, effectively and that employees are satisfied with their work environment. 

HR Specialist Job Responsibilities

The day-to-day tasks of a human resource specialist may include hiring applicants, training new employees and administrative tasks. A more detailed list of job responsibilities includes: 

  • Coordinating with Management: Human resources specialists may work with management to implement policies and procedures, provide training, and advise on recruiting or retention programs. 
  • Searching for Qualified Candidates: Human resources specialists may use internet recruiting sources, advertisements, job fairs, and several other resources to find qualified job applicants.  
  • Maintaining Employment Records: Records may include benefits, performance evaluations, addressing employee relations issues, and keeping records of events (hiring, leaves, or transfers).  

Additional Skills and Qualities

Outside of human resources and administrative knowledge, there are several skills valuable for human resources specialists. The Occupational Information Network (O*Net), a database consisting of information associated with occupations, includes the following in their list of skills: 

  • Active Listening: This includes taking the time to understand what an employee is communicating. Asking questions and not interrupting shows full attention is being given.  
  • Problem Sensitivity: Being able to anticipate something is or is about to go wrong allows organizations to effectively problem solve 
  • Communication: Human resource specialists both receive and provide oral and written communications. It is important that they can understand ideas and have clear, audience-focused communication themselves.  

HR Specialist Salary and Career Outlook

According to the Bureau of Labor Statistics (BLS), as of May 2021, the average annual salary for a human resources specialist is $62,290, with the top 10% earning up to $108,160. 

Career outlook from the BLS shows an 8% job growth between 2021 and 2031, which is faster than the average employment rate for all occupations. According to data the BLS collected in 2021, the industries with most human resource specialist jobs are in the Employment Services and Management of Companies and Enterprises industries.  

The salary range and outlook for the role may depend on several factors such as company size, location, and the professional’s education and tenure. In addition, companies may offer bonuses or other incentives based on performance. 

Training and Development Manager 

A training and development manager is responsible for creating and delivering effective training programs to improve employee skills and knowledge, while ensuring alignment with the overall goals of the organization. 

Job Responsibilities

According to the BLS, common tasks for training and development managers may include overseeing training programs, staff and budgets. More detailed job responsibilities include: 

  • Training and Coaching: Oversee training and development; including selecting and implementing programs.  
  • Matching Organizational Goals: Work with managers and superiors to make sure that programs, budgets, and assessments are effective and align with company goals.  
  • Administrative Tasks: Complete administrative tasks such as scheduling, coordinating work, and maintaining files or reports.  

Additional Skills and Qualities

Outside of the job responsibilities, there are several skills and qualities valuable for training and development managers. Skills mentioned by O*Net include: 

  • Learning Strategies: This includes the ability to produce innovative ideas, select and implement new procedures, and instruct others.  
  • Management: Training and development managers should have the ability to plan, organize, and direct resources (such as people, finances and materials) to achieve specific goals and objectives. 
  • Deductive Reasoning: Training and development managers should be able to look at different situations or patterns and arrive at a logical conclusion based on the available evidence. 

While this role typically requires a bachelor’s degree, there are merits to having a master’s degree with a focus in management, development, or business administration. This qualification could have an impact on salary and benefits.  

Salary and Career Outlook

According to the BLS, as of May 2021, the average annual salary for a training and development manager is $120,130. Data also shows the top 10% can earn up to $207,420 annually. 

Career outlook from the BLS shows a 7% projected job growth between 2021 and 2031. Data showed industries with the highest level of employment for training and development managers in 2021 existed in professional, scientific, and technical services. Management of companies and enterprises closely followed. 

The salary range and outlook for the role may depend on several factors such as company size, location, and the professional’s education and tenure.  

Diversity and Inclusion Manager 

Diversity and inclusion (D&I) managers maintain a diverse workplace by developing and implementing diversity initiatives within an organization.  

D&I Manager Job Responsibilities

The day-to-day responsibilities of a D&I manager involve working closely with human resources to create and maintain an inclusive work environment.  

  • Developing training programs: Diversity and inclusion managers research and develop programs to foster an organization’s diversity. They also provide training aligned with best practices and legal compliance.  
  • Reviewing the hiring process: This includes making sure that policies and job advertisements meet equal opportunity guidelines and exclude biases. Diversity and inclusion managers are also often in charge of recruiting employees from diverse backgrounds with the use of developed strategies. 
  • Mediating complaints: This may include investigating harassment complaints, applying knowledge of diversity-related issues to the situation, and providing policy updates to colleagues.  

Additional Skills and Qualities

Outside of general job responsibility knowledge, there are several skills valuable for diversity and inclusion managers. Skills mentioned by Indeed include: 

  • Communication and problem-solving: Clear verbal and written communication skills are needed for conflict mediation. Communication, along with analytical thinking helps with problem-solving.  
  • Understanding of laws and regulations: Diversity and inclusion managers should be knowledgeable of federal, state, and local equal employment opportunity laws and regulations.  
  • Organizational Skills: Organization is important when implementing new training or programs, revising job descriptions, and establishing disability services and accommodations. 

D&I Manager Salary and Career Outlook

According to Indeed, as of March 2023, the average annual salary for a diversity and inclusion manager is $84,083. Data also shows the top salaries are more than $149,851. 

Career outlook from the BLS, which classifies diversity and inclusion managers under the training and development manager role, shows an 8% projected job growth between 2021 and 2031, which is faster than the average employment rate for all occupations.   

The salary range and outlook for the role may depend on several factors such as company size, location, and the professional’s education and tenure. In addition, companies may offer bonuses or other incentives based on performance. 

Ways to Explore Human Resources Management 

Florida Tech offers various programs for students to gain expertise in the field of human resource management.   

The Human Resources Management Minor offers students a comprehensive education in the field of HR, including areas such as recruitment, training, benefits and labor relations. This program can be pursued as an additional specialization alongside a Florida Tech bachelor’s program and is available completely online. The curriculum is designed to prepare students for industry-recognized certification exams, including the Professional in Human Resources (PHR) and Global Professional in Human Resources (GPHR) certifications. 

A BA in Human Resources Management program from Florida Tech can prepare students for a variety of career options in the growing field of human resources management. The 100% online curriculum follows an interdisciplinary approach to managing human resources, covering business fundamentals as well as specialized management courses. Similar to a degree in HR, it also includes topics such as training and development, compensation and benefits, and selection and placement. 

Florida Tech’s online Human Resources Management bachelor’s degree program has been recognized for aligning with SHRM’s HR Curriculum Guidebook. As a result, graduates of the degree program have the opportunity to obtain professional certifications from external organizations. While some employers may not require professional certification, it has the potential to demonstrate knowledge and skill in human resource topics.  

 

**National long-term projections may not reflect local and/or short-term economic or job conditions, and do not guarantee actual job growth. Information provided is not intended to represent a complete list of hiring companies or job titles, and program options do not guarantee career or salary outcomes. Students should conduct independent research for specific employment information. 

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